About Nellie Peters United Methodist Church

About Us

We welcome all people into our church
We believe God's grace is available to all people, no matter where you're from, what you look like, or what you've done. That's why our communion table is open to all. We hope you'll come join us this Sunday for worship.

We are a casual group that feels like family. Whether you come alone or come with your own family, you'll feel welcome at Nellie Peters United Methodist Church. We think children should be an integral part of our worship service. That's why our sanctuary includes a "Grace Space" where children can draw and color while participating in worship.

We express our love for God through active discipleship.
To us, church is about sharing God's love by offering hope and healing to those looking for more meaning in their lives. Acts of personal faith and public worship help us grow closer to God, but we also grow in our faith by taking action outside the church walls to help others.

Christ and His earliest followers reached out to those in need, caring for the sick and abandoned when others turned away. Like Him, we are drawn to help those suffering from hunger, disease, or injustice. Those recovering from disaster. Those in need of education, clean water, or simply someone to let them know they are not alone. We seek to live our faith in ways that create change in the world.

We are part of a diverse, worldwide community of churches bound by faith and service to the world.
Reaching from the local church to neighboring communities and all around the globe, United Methodists share a mutually determined common mission. By working together, we accomplish more. A web of local churches with a global scope, we seek out opportunities to transform lives.

About Our Christian Roots

United Methodists share a common heritage with all Christians. According to our foundational statement of beliefs in The Book of Discipline, we share the following basic affirmations in common with all Christian communities:

God
God, who is one, is revealed in three distinct persons. Read More

Jesus
We believe in the mystery of salvation through Jesus Christ. God became human in Jesus of Nazareth; and his life, death and resurrection demonstrates God's redeeming love. Read More

The Holy Spirit
The Holy Spirit is God's present activity in our midst. When we sense God's leading, God's challenge, or God's support or comfort, it's the Holy Spirit at work. Read More

Human beings
Genesis 1:27 asserts that we've been made in the image of the Creator. Like God we have the capacity to love and care, to communicate, and to create. Read More

The church
The church is the body of Christ, an extension of Christ's life and ministry in the world today. Read More

The Bible
We believe that the Bible is God's Word and is the primary authority for our faith and practice. Read More

God's reign
The kingdom or reign of God is both a present reality and future hope. Read More

About Salvation

What does it mean to be saved and to be assured of salvation? It's to know that after feeling lost and alone, we've been found by God. It's to know that after feeling worthless, we've been redeemed. It's to experience a reunion with God, others, the natural world, and our own best selves. It's a healing of the alienation — the estrangement — we've experienced. In salvation we become whole. Salvation happens to us both now and for the future. It's "eternal life," that new quality of life in unity with God of which the Gospel of John speak — a life that begins not at death, but in the present. But how does salvation happen?

By grace through faith
Salvation cannot be earned. There's no behavior, no matter how holy or righteous, by which we can achieve salvation. Rather, it's the gift of a gracious God.

By grace we mean God's extraordinary love for us. In most of life we're accustomed to earning approval from others. This is true at school, at work, in society, even at home — to a degree. We may feel that we have to act "just so" to be liked or loved. But God's love, or grace, is given without any regard for our goodness. It's unmerited, unconditional, and unending love.

As we come to accept this love, to entrust ourselves to it, and to ground our lives in it, we discover the wholeness that God has promised. This trust, as we've seen, is called faith. God takes the initiative in grace; but only as we respond through faith is the change formed in us.

This is the great theme of the Protestant Reformers, as well as John Wesley and the Methodists who followed: We're saved by grace alone through faith alone. We're made whole and reconciled by the love of God as we receive it and trust in it.

Conversion
This process of salvation involves a change in us that we call conversion. Conversion is a turning around, leaving one orientation for another. It may be sudden and dramatic, or gradual and cumulative. But in any case it's a new beginning. Following Jesus' words to Nicodemus, "you must be born again" (John 3:7 CSB), we speak of this conversion as rebirth, new life in Christ, or regeneration.

Following Paul and Luther, John Wesley called this process justification. Justification is what happens when Christians abandon all those vain attempts to justify themselves before God, to be seen as "just" in God's eyes through religious and moral practices. It's a time when God's "justifying grace" is experienced and accepted, a time of pardon and forgiveness, of new peace and joy and love. Indeed, we're justified by God's grace through faith.

Justification is also a time of repentance — turning away from behaviors rooted in sin and toward actions that express God's love. In this conversion we can expect to receive assurance of our present salvation because the Holy Spirit "testifies together with our spirit that we are God's children" (Romans 8:16 CSB).

Growing in grace
Conversion is but the beginning of the new life of wholeness. Through what Wesley called God's "sanctifying grace," we can continue to grow. In fact, Wesley affirmed, we're to press on, with God's help, in the path of sanctification, the gift of Christian perfection. The goal of the sanctified life is to be perfected in love, to experience the pure love of God and others, a holiness of heart and life, a total death to sin. We're not there yet; but by God's grace, as we United Methodists say, "we're going on to perfection!"